Kindle Paperwhite, 6″ High Resolution Display with Next-Gen Built-in Light, Wi-Fi

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  1. J. Chambers says:
    115 of 130 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    More evolutionary than revolutionary, but worth the upgrade, September 30, 2013
    By 
    J. Chambers (Georgia, United States) –
    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)
      
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    This is the fifth e-ink Kindle reader that I’ve bought. My wife and I were early adopters of Kindle, and when we buy a new Kindle, the old one goes to the next niece or nephew in line. I loved the original Paperwhite, with its small size, touch screen, front-lighting, and virtual keyboard. The all-new Paperwhite is a definite step up, and for me, it was worth the move, but others will have to decide for themselves. If you read a lot, and you don’t already have one of the newer e-ink Kindles, it’s definitely worth upgrading to the Paperwhite. If you have the original Paperwhite, the upgrade is well worth considering. Although I’ve only had the new Paperwhite a few hours, I’m already glad I upgraded. Here’s a summary of my initial impressions of the new Paperwhite.

    SIZE: It’s the same size as the original Paperwhite – 6.7″x4.6″x0.36″. The weight has been reduced slightly from 7.8 ounces to 7.3 ounces. The Paperwhite is very comfortable to hold in one hand, which is how I usually read. The really good news is that if you have a case for the original Paperwhite, it will also fit the new one (thank you, Amazon). If you buy a case, I highly recommend that the case include the magnetic AutoWake function. It’s much easier to turn the Kindle on and off without fumbling for the small power switch.

    LIGHTING: The front-lighting is noticeably improved over the original Paperwhite, which had slightly visible shadows coming from the bottom edge where the LED lights were located. (It didn’t bother me, but some readers were annoyed by that.) I couldn’t see any shadows in the new Paperwhite, where the lighting appears brighter and more uniform. With the Paperwhite’s front lighting, you’ll never need a clip-on light, even in total darkness.

    TOUCH SCREEN: The text appears a bit crisper with more contrast, even though the 212 ppi resolution is the same as the original Paperwhite (but it’s much better than the 169 ppi of the earlier Kindles). Unlike backlit tablets and phones, which wash out badly in sunlight, the Paperwhite is very readable in any lighting condition from total darkness to bright sunshine, simply by adjusting the lighting level. The touch screen’s responsiveness has been noticeably improved. Swiping the page with a finger or touching the left or right sides of a page turns it immediately. With my old Paperwhite, I sometimes had to swipe or touch twice. The new Paperwhite is definitely more responsive with faster-turning pages.

    BATTERY: According to Amazon, “A single charge can last up to eight weeks (based on a half hour of reading per day with wireless off and the light setting at ten).” Certainly not all Kindle readers fit this profile. As much as I read, and because I download so many books that I leave the wireless turned on, I routinely recharge it about once every week or so just to bring the battery to full charge. In any case, the battery life is several times that of backlit tablets and phones. With the high-speed chargers that are available now, battery life shouldn’t be an issue with the new Paperwhite.

    OTHER COMMENTS: As a touch screen e-book reader, the Paperwhite has no physical I/O, aside from a power button and a recharging/data port. Unlike earlier e-ink Kindles, there’s no provision for audio output, so you won’t be reading audiobooks on the Paperwhite.

    NEW OR IMPROVED FEATURES: The X-Ray feature from the original Paperwhite has been retained and improved to be more context sensitive. The new in-line footnotes that can be read without losing your place will make footnoted nonfiction books a more enjoyable experience, as will be the new navigation feature that lets you scroll forward and backward without leaving the page you’re on. I haven’t had a chance to play around with those very much, but what I’ve seen so far looks very promising. The new Paperwhite does not include FreeTime for kids or the built-in version of Goodreads (now owned by Amazon), but these features are expected to be added in a software update by the end of this year.

    SPECIAL OFFERS: It’s $20 more if you want to eliminate the special offers. You can do this at the time you buy the Paperwhite, or you can do it later online. Honestly, you get used to the special offers very quickly, and in my opinion, it’s not worth the money to do away with them. Also, they don’t interfere with your reading – you only see them when you turn on the Kindle, and after swiping the screen with your finger, they go away.

    THE VERDICT: The new Paperwhite is the state-of-the-art e-ink ebook reader. With improved screen contrast for better readability, a more sensitive touch screen with faster page turns, and some new or improved features that enhance the reading experience, it was worth upgrading from the original Paperwhite.

    Note: I also have a Kindle Fire HD 7″, which I use for web browsing, emails, apps, and music, but for most reading, I prefer the…

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  2. jjceo (jjceo@comcast . net) says:
    82 of 97 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A new step forward for me in reading on my Kindle!, September 30, 2013
    By 
    jjceo (jjceo@comcast . net) (Greenwood, Indiana) –
    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)
      
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    Customer Video Review Length:: 8:38 Mins

    I have loved and used my Kindle Keyboard for years now but I missed not being able to read it in a room with low lighting or in the dark. I purchased a Kindle Fire and I also use an iPad 3 but for ease of reading on my eyes I prefer the Kindle Keyboard. I wanted to get a Kindle Paperwhite e-Reader but I held off until this new generation was released before I spent my money. I got this because I wanted to reduce my eyestrain from reading in the evening and I just love this new tablet. It offers the perfect balance of a lit screen with reduced eyestrain and high clarity and contrast of the text.

    I have added a video of the Kindle Paperwhite compared to a Kindle Keyboard and a Kindle Fire. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me and I will try to answer them.

    I love that the text on the screen is crisp and clear. I use the Kindle because my declining vision caused me to stop reading books. Reading was my number one hobby my entire life and I just loved it. The Kindle has brought back that reading experience and now with the crisper text and lit screen I can enjoy my reading in every type of environment. I laid my Kindle Keyboard and the New Kindle Paperwhite side by side and the comparison of the quality of text and clarity is amazingly in favor of the new Paperwhite. The new lighting system and screen clarity is where this Paperwhite design really is outstanding. With better contrast, lighting and custom designed fonts, the text just pops out of the screen like you have not seen in an e-Reader before. With 221 PPI (Pixels Per Inch) this screen provides a 768 by 1024 pixel screen that just makes the old Kindle Keyboard look old fashioned. Technology certainly does move quickly on.

    My favorite time to read is the last two hours of the evening before bedtime. Unfortunately that is the worst time to use a non-lit screen e-Reader. I went to using the Kindle Fire and the iPad 3. Unfortunately I noticed eyestrain that limited my reading time and I did not get the full enjoyment of spending my time reading. This new soft lit screen is unobtrusive and for me my eyes do not get tired of reading like they do on the Kindle Fire and on the iPad. After reading on the other backlit tablets I feel like I have that 1000 yard stare with dry and tired eyes. This lighting effect is softer and easier to read without the tired eyes and blurry vision. I am glad that I finally made the investment to get an updated Kindle Paperwhite.

    There are 8 font sizes and 6 different font styles. They are Baskerville, Futura, Caecilia, Helvetica, Caecilia Condensed and Palatino. The fonts have been fine tuned to offer additional sharpness and clarity which is great for reducing eyestrain and fatigue. I love the new dictionary feature that creates a Vocabulary Builder which is a list of the words that you looked up and you can review the list and use flashcards to enhance your vocabulary and reading skills.

    I thought that I would have trouble making the transition from the Kindle Keyboard to the New Kindle Paperwhite but it was a breeze. I think that using a touch screen and using finger swipes to turn pages and emulated keyboards like on the Kindle Fire and iPad made it a natural transition to this new Kindle. There is a minor learning curve of learning where to touch the screen but the changeover was fast and easy. The capacitive touch response of the screen is very nice. It makes the New Paperwhite respond quickly to finger touches, menu changes and page turns and the faster CPU helps there also.

    What I like about the Kindle Paperwhite is that it is a dedicated e-Reader and it combines the best features of the Kindle e-ink and the iPad/Kindle Fire.

    * Ultra lightweight at 7.3 ounces and easily held for hours with one hand. I love the size and weight as it is comfortable to hold for long periods of time and you don’t find yourself laying down the Paperwhite like I would be doing with my iPad 3.
    * Lit screen for reading in poorly lighted areas like the iPad and Kindle Fire but without the eyestrain. The lighting level is adjustable.
    * High clarity of the text and contrast for easy reading
    * Fast charging time in 4 hours
    * Ability to be easily read in the sunlight with no screen glare.
    * WIFI connectability
    * Battery life of 28 hours (of reading time) depending on the WIFI usage and screen brightness used.
    * Touch screen control
    * Easy page turning and access to the onboard dictionary, access to Wikipedia and X-Ray.
    * Easy to access menu and setup was a breeze
    * 25% faster response for loading books and page turning thanks to a faster microprocessor.
    * Small, thin and highly portable
    * Able to carry 1,100 books
    * My favorite feature is the adjustable text size and font style!
    * Custom tuned fonts add clarity and crispness to the…

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  3. 108 of 129 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The best Kindle yet, but only minor improvements from the previous model, September 30, 2013
    By 
    Scott
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    Amazon is now getting into the habit of releasing a new version of its Kindle e-reader every year. 2011 introduced the most significant change with the Kindle Touch, and 2012’s Paperwhite was just as innovative with the introduction of the built-in edge lighting. Amazon has now released its second generation of the Paperwhite reader. Although the changes are fairly small compared to previous Kindle releases, they have added value to the device, and I think it is a worthy upgrade for “some” people, although the technology hasn’t advanced enough for me to recommend it to everyone. This review will mostly focus on the differences between the 2013 Paperwhite and the previous model and Kindle Touch.

    FORM FACTOR
    Holding the 2013 and 2012 Paperwhites side by side, I could not tell any difference between the form factor of the two (with the exception of the “Amazon” logo on the back instead of “Kindle”). The best thing about this is that it means you won’t have to replace your cover again, which can cost half of the price of the Kindle. The form factor from the 2012 model is almost perfect, so I think there is little to improve on here. It would be nice if it was a millimeter or two thinner though.

    HARDWARE – There are 4 main hardware improvements to the 2013 Paperwhite over last year’s model. While none of them make the 2013 Paperwhite as significant of a leap as the 2012 Paperwhite was to the Touch, they do make it a better device overall.

    1. Better Edge Lighting – One common complaint with the original Paperwhite was the smudge effect seen at the bottom of the device. This appears as four darker smudges coming up from the bottom edge. I always thought this was a very minor problem and it never bothered me, and it was only noticeable if you looked for it, but it was still a blemish. The new Paperwhite has eliminated this issue, and the lighting is now even all around. This is what the glow lighting should have been to begin with, and it looks amazing.

    2. Higher Contrast – Amazon advertises higher contrast and a brighter display with this model, which uses E Ink Pearl 2 compared to Pearl 1 in the 2012 model. I could not tell a difference between looking at it side by side with the 2012 model. The brightness on the previous version has always been sufficient for me, although I imagine the improved contrast may be beneficial when reading for long periods of time.

    3. Faster Processor – Amazon advertises a 25% faster processor (1Ghz compared to 800Mhz on previous model). You wouldn’t think 25% would make a difference given how fast the previous model turned pages, but I saw a noticeable improvement in response time when flipping pages. I don’t really know why you need this, since page flipping has never really been slow in previous generations, but it is there and does improve the reading experience slightly. This will mostly affect those who are faster readers. The easiest way I can describe this is that with my 2012 model, I would get to the end of the page, flip to the next page, and then scan my eyes up to the top left to start reading again. There would be about a quarter second delay while the Kindle reloaded the page and caught up to my eye. Now when I do it, the page loads and changes right when my eye reaches the screen, so there is less of a delay while I continue the sentence. This never bothered me before, but it’s nice now that I know I can have it. There is also a longer time between refresh “flashes.” With the previous generation, the screen would flash for half a second every 6th page turn. Now it waits twice as long before the flashes. It’s not very noticeable on either model however.

    4. Improved Touch Response – this is supposed to allow for a better response from the Kindle to page turns and selecting items. I didn’t notice any difference with forward page turning, but did notice it is easier to turn backwards. One complaint I have had with the 2012 Paperwhite is that many times I will try to select a single word to view a definition, and the Kindle will select an entire sentence or phrase. This happens maybe 50% of the time. although not eliminated entirely, this does seem to be improved, and I found it easier to select words on this version of the Paperwhite. I did still see the occasional miss-select though (maybe about 20% of the time).

    SOFTWARE – There are 4 main improvements to the 2013 Paperwhite over the previous model. Even though Amazon could likely issue all of these to Touch and 2012 Paperwhite owners through a software update, it’s likely they will limit them to this model to encourage purchases.

    1. Goodreads Integration – One of my main software complaints last year was that the Paperwhite didn’t integrate with Amazon’s Shelfari social book catalog site. This seemed like a huge wasted opportunity. Amazon has apparently realized this and at least integrated it with their Goodreads service…

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